History of Malaga

Museum of Malaga – take a trip down Malaga’s DNA

Most things in Malaga take time, but they are usually worth the wait in the end. The Museum of Malaga is no exception.

As an institution, the Museum of Malaga was created in 1972. Its function was to bring together the city’s Museum of Fine Arts and the Provincial Archaeological Museum.

The Provincial Museum of Fine Arts first opened to the public in 1916. After several moves, it settled in the Palacio de los Condes de Buenavista. It remained there until 1997 when the local government chose it to house the Picasso Museum (2004).

The year 1947 saw the birth of the Provincial Archaeological Museum of Malaga. It originally found a home in the recently restored Alcazaba (Moorish castle). In 1996, rehabilitation of the Alcazaba required a move. The collection was temporarily housed in different sites. For years, part of the collection was not available to the public eye.

‘Anatomía del corazón’ ‘Anatomy of the heart’ by Enrique Simonet y Lombardo. 1890.

The Customs building

After decades, the Museum of Malaga finally met its original function: to unite under one roof its two collections: art and archaeology. The museum opened its doors to the public last December bringing together the aforementioned museums under one single institution. Like most large museums in Spain, it is under state ownership and regional management.

The Museum of Malaga is located in the Palacio de la Aduana (Customs House). The building is an 18th century city landmark. It came into being in the wake of the trading boom experienced in Malaga in the late 18th century when it started trading with America. Its strategic location in the heart of the city and on the cultural route to emblematic landmarks (Alcazaba, Cathedral, Roman theatre). It makes the building, a work of art in itself, the perfect location for the museum.

The collections

‘The birth of Venus’. Roman mosaic. II A.D.

This impressive building is made up of four floors. Firstly, you start your visit on the second floor by the archaeological section. This will allow you to walk through nearly 3,000 years of history, from prehistorical times to the legacy of early Iberian tribes, Carthaginians, Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs to this day.

You will be then make your way down to the second floor. This is the area where the fine arts is exposed. Finally, when you reach the ground floor, you will get a chance to walk through the store room where several pieces of art works are stored and also spend time in the wonderful patio with its fountain and orange trees.

Inner patio at Customs House where the museum is located

The museum has 18,400 square meters and 8 rooms. 5 are dedicated to archaeology (15000 pieces) and 3 are dedicated to fine arts (2000 pieces). It is today Spain’s fifth largest museum and the largest in Andalusia.

Whether you are an art connoisseur or not, it is definitely worth a visit during your stay in the city. Going to the Museum will help you understand how the turbulent 2,800 years of Malaga’s history have shaped the city that we know and love today.

Address:  Plaza de la Aduana s/n  29015. Málaga
Telephones:  951911904-600160881
Director: María Morente del Monte

Website: http://www.museosdeandalucia.es/cultura/museos/MMA/

Opening times
Winter: (16 September-15 June)
Tuesday to Saturday: 9:00 to 20:30.
Sunday and public holidays: from 9:00 to 15:30.
Monday: closed

Summer: (16 June-15 September)
Tuesday to Sundays: from 9:00 to 15:30
Monday: closed

The museum is open on all public holidays except 1 and 6 January, 1 May, 24, 25 and 31 December.
Admittance for EU citizens with proof of nationality: free of charge. Other nationalities: €1.50.

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